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of the first sewer systems were on the east coast of the united states, often in places that already had developed a citywide water supply system. sullivan: in 1630, boston was basically three mountains, there were very steep hills. waste would run down quickly and dump into the harbor. and the tide would carry most of it away. well, this worked well for a while. the problem was, as boston wanted to expand, it started filling in the mudflats. the water could come rushing down the hill, it would hit the flat area and slow down. at high tide, it couldn't get out at all. it got so bad that the city took over, 'cause the city has a responsibility to protect its citizens. boston built the first modern sewer system in the united states. ours was completed between 1877 and 1884. with this wonderful new sewer system, we were taking our filth and moving it out to the ocean. of course, all of this was untreated. in the 1960s, we were still pumping all of our sewage out to moon island, untreated. we would get swimmers here, never knowing, in the middle of summer, why you would have a cold. well, we
. there is a situation which you have an immigrant in the united states, even the legal residents there is a lot more power, he is boring to get custody of the child. the other one, i did not know if you know this, i did not share the concern about the actual domestic violence. the only concern is to make an example. i did not think the evidence supports the sheriff is a batterer. he made a mistake, but that is not battery. >> first of all, i want to thank you for service. and i know it has been a very long haul. you are essentially on during your term -- time under very trying servichy i am a long-time resident. he was elected by the people of san francisco, and it should be up to us, the voters, not the mayor or city attorney to decide if he is to remain as our share of. as for official misconduct, i see none other than that on the part of the mayor who took it upon himself to defy the will of the voters without due process or pay. he has taken full responsibility for his actions on the 31st. i take full responsibility. his wife, miss lopez, stands by her goesq husband and wants to reunite with her
. in the united states, the richest 1% owned 38% of all wealth. the bottom 90% hold 73% of all debt. we are wiping out the planet and the public is left holding the bag. we definitely need something completely different. putting the moral outrage aside for a second, this situation also puts cities at great risk. we've only gotten a taste of the destruction that -- disruption as possible with the numerous revolutions that broke out. the crisis will land hardest in cities. i see city's borrowing language from complexity theory, i see the boys and a critical state. it is a new situation. 50% of global population is urban, young, and connected by mobile phones. the young are the hardest hit here. in spain, the unemployment rate for young adults is around 50%. in the united states, college graduates are leaving school with an average of $24,000 in student loan debt into labor market for their age group that has not been as bad as it is today since the depression or the 1940's. the smallest thing can trigger a crisis now. it is a powder keg. on the other hand, along with this crisis is a powerful new se
of the united states will play a strong part in the development of these vehicles. as well as we also started a venture firm. the venture fund operates out of new york. it started 15 months ago, we made our first investment in a company called my city way, which is working on intermodal transport. started in new york, now in 35 cities around the country and many cities around the world provided information to not only our customers, but also anyone interested in moving from a to be in a city. that has worked exceedingly well. as you have seen, we have been investing in other companies as well. the electric charging stations system is another one of those. as is our first in this and in parking. most of us leave our house is in the morning, go to work, part of our cars at work, leave a vacant parking space at home. if you can bring a marketplace together where someone can park under drive during the day, and of course, give them a certainty of where they will part, it works. many thousands of customers now are enjoying that has a potential different way of operating in the city. drive now was
to become the first registered terminal and one of the must modern and sustainable terminals and the united states. the public art program continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may
s are actually paying for it. narrator: cities and municipalities across the united states are now facing this funding gap, between projected revenue and projected expenses, as they strive to maintain water quality and meet demand. new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do
from all or the united states. >> they were overwhelmed with the same chance to get married. >> we started to get them couple by couple and that line starting going down the hall way, around the block and continued over the weekend. they drove from washington, oregon, we saw families and hoping they would get through the door before we closed down for the day and the next day they want come back. we had very little time to plan. >> in 2004, when the city opened up marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples we were here. and then got in and got married. we were so appreciative for the city to do this and make it available. it was for chaos. >> in 2004, we had no idea what to expect. we had originally wanted to marry under the 9:00 a.m. court opening. meaning we were trying to do it in a way where we could get the first marriage under the bell before the courts came in to stop us. what we didn't know was what we didn't know. it's going about things and not knowing the consequences. we had to quickly organize a way to get through the enormity of requests to get married >> later tha
today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much o
of california, and the united states as well. i'm required to do so in a completely even-handed manner. i do so with no problem and with all the love in my heart. that being said, it would be ridiculous, disingenuous and completely unhelpful not to realize that certain segments within our population here in san francisco need help more than others. it would be absolutely preposterous for me to sit up here and tell you that we're going to approach polices of economic advantagement in an even-handed manner. that would do a disservice to and again, we are a weaker city if we allow certain segments of you are population to essentially rot. we're a stronger, vibrant and more resilient city if we address the issues of those least among us, tackle them, and face them head-on. >> thank you. >> that is what i'm about. truth and honesty in our policy approached. >> mr. resignato. >> i think one important thing we need to look at is vision. really, you know? a vision for what san francisco is going to be. and i think that involves looking at a lot of different things. one thing that daniel mentioned
ever done in the united states. narrator: small-scale projects like nine mile run have far-reaching environmental impact. but they're just one part of the regional wet weather control plan. schombert: this region needs to solve its problem by 2026. that's not that long away. this is the largest public works project ever undertaken in this region. lichte: you're looking at significant infrastructure. either tunnels or storage tanks, or, you know, treatment facilities. the cost is about $3 billion. lichte: if you look at some of the other cities that have gone through this, their rates have gone up significantly. the federal government provides a number of grant programs but the bottom line is, you know, it's not enough. there's a massive need of money out there for wastewater and water infrastructure improvements around the country. narrator: the struggle for funds is as great in small towns as it is in metropolitan areas. oberstar: the federal government has let down municipalities. the first investment under the '72 clean water act was to deal with the biggest waste stream
the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco pu
will tell you it is the largest in the state. so, for the inspectors assigned to that unit's, we tried to engage them to open up. i agree with the gentleman at the end. security is paramount. we feel that as the police department, we want you to please yourself. as the commander mentioned, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan managemen
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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